How CNC Woodworking Machines Have Changed Woodworking

In the early 1970s, computer numerical control (CNC) machinery changed how commercial woodwork was performed. Prior to its invention, woodworking relied on equipment that was controlled manually. Machines that featured CNC technology replaced manual control with computer control. Instead of manipulating a machine as it worked, the machine operator could program the machine to work automatically. For woodworking companies, this scenario brought two instant benefits: it allowed them to staff fewer machine operators, and it reduced on the job injuries.

CNCMachinery and Machine Operators

Prior to CNC woodworking machines, woodworking companies staffed enough workers to fill each machine station in a facility. But the invention of CNC machinery made it possible for a single worker to oversee two or more machines – an arrangement that made eliminating certain types of woodworking positions purely beneficial for companies.

Today, the job growth for some woodworking careers is predicted to decline over the next decade, even as commercial woodwork is expected to be in high demand. Part of the reason for the predicted decline is as old as CNC machinery: the automation of certain woodworking processes, and the resultant need for fewer woodworkers.

The automation that CNC machinery brings to woodworking could negatively impact employment figures, but the safety it brings to the workplace is a blessing. For decades, commercial woodwork has been a dangerous occupation due to workers’ close proximity to cutting mechanisms and heavy, collapsible machine parts. Computer-controlled machinery makes woodworking safer by removing workers from the vicinity of these components. Instead of standing close to the point of woodwork, they are positioned at computer interface that controls the cutting mechanism.

This arrangement is also good news for companies. By removing workers from dangerous situations, computer-controlled machines help reduce workers comp cases, which can cost large companies millions of dollars a year.

Improved Quality and Production Rate

It is an old rule of manufacturing that, as production rate increases product quality decreases. But CNC production is an exception. In fact, CNC machines produce better work than traditional machines while producing it at a higher rate. This odd combination results from the pairing of versatile cutting capacity with computer programming. Unlike standard machines, CNC woodworking machines can cut on multiple axes. When powered by software that registers the precise coordinates of the planned design, this elite cutting capacity makes intricate, accurate, high production woodwork a reality. Get More Knowledge about teds woodworking review

But are benefits of CNC equipment worth the price tag?

It depends on whom you ask, but most commercial woodworkers would say yes. In addition to the collateral benefits of using computer-controlled machinery (e.g. fewer waste pieces and fewer injuries); its ability to boost revenue by meeting increased production demand is remarkable. If you need to buy CNC machinery on a limited equipment budget, buying an industrial CNC machine used is an excellent option, one that many woodworkers choose out of preference.